UV2018 Finalists Announced!

SCBWI British Isles is proud to announce the promising, unpublished writers and illustrators who have been selected from a record number of submissions to be included in Undiscovered Voices 2018.

SCBWI congratulates the following authors and illustrators whose work will be featured in the anthology:

  • Annie Walmsley – Writer
  • Dale Hannah – Writer
  • David Hall – Writer
  • Deborah Sheehy – Illustrator
  • Emily Jones- Illustrator
  • Emma Mason – Writer
  • Hannah Mosley – Illustrator
  • Jacob Turner – Illustrator
  • James Crosland-Mills – Illustrator
  • Janet Catherine Gibson Pickering – Illustrator
  • Kate Read – Illustrator
  • Kathryn Kettle – Writer
  • Katie Hayoz – Writer
  • Laure Allain – Illustrator
  • Matthew Olson-Roy – Writer
  • Monika Baum – Illustrator
  • Nicola Penfold – Writer
  • Peta Freestone – Writer
  • Rachel Lovatt – Illustrator
  • Sally Walker – Illustrator
  • Sandy Horsley – Illustrator
  • Sarah Merrett – Writer
  • Serena Patel – Writer

The Undiscovered Voices anthology is available to download for free from www.undiscoveredvoices.com. A printed copy of the anthology also will be available to purchase from Lulu: http://www.lulu.com/shop/scbwi/undiscovered-voices-2018/paperback/product-23456467.html

The stories and illustrations were submitted anonymously and selected by a distinguished panel of industry experts:

UV 2018’s Judges:

  • Chrissie Boehm, Artful Doodlers
  • Claire Cartey, Holroyde Cartey
  • Erzsi Deak, Hen & Ink Literary Studio
  • Lauren Fortune, Scholastic
  • Clelia Gore, Martin Literary Management
  • Andrea Kearney, Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Sarah Leonard, Orchard Books
  • Joanna Moult, Skylark Literary Agency
  • Polly Nolan, The Greenhouse Literary Agency
  • Gillie Russell, Aitken Alexander Associates
  • Hannah Sheppard, DHH Literary Agency
  • Kirsty Stansfield, Nosy Crow
  • Will Steele, Usborne Books
  • Nghiem Ta, Walker Books

Because the anthology is also designed to be a learning tool for up-and-coming children’s writers and artists, quotes from the judges – discussing the merits of each piece – are included at the end of each illustration and extract.

Working Partners Ltd, a London-based company that creates series fiction for children and teens, provided the financial support that made this anthology possible.

Congratulations to this year’s Undiscovered Voices writers and illustrators!

Win Win Win with UV2018!

Submissions for the next Undiscovered Voices open on Saturday! To celebrate, UV founder Sara Grant is giving away books this week. It’s her chance to support her fellow Undiscovered Voices writers and indy bookshops. Follow her on Twitter @AuthorSaraGrant for details and a chance to win books from Imogen White, Simon James Green, Dave Cousins, Kate Scott, Katie Dale, Claire Fayers, Candy Gourlay, Jane Hardstaff, Sarwat Chadda, Jane Benson McLoughlin & Shirley McMillan.

Undiscovered Voices helped launch the careers of 37+ writers with more than 200 books sold worldwide. We can’t wait to see who we will discover next!

Tonight, Monday 26th June, Sara Grant, Benjamin Scott, and Loretta Schauer will be taking questions as part of a live chat from 8pm to 9 p.m. for any last minute Undiscovered Voices questions.

Getting Ready for UV2018 – Guest Blog with Kate Scott

In our fifth guest blog by a past finalist, Kate Scott, who was featured in the first UV anthology back in 2008, talks about saying yes to changes and inspiration. 

The Magic of Saying Yes

I have a good friend who has taken improv classes for years (‘improv’ being the obligatory shortening of ‘improvisation’ – those extra three syllables being presumably too taxing [or uncool] for those who have been initiated into the process’s dark arts).

As I understand it, taking improv classes involves being willing to writhe on the floor, stick chewing gum in your ear, or arrange chairs into endless representations of impromptu and entirely imaginary cars, airplanes or art sculptures. I am not brave enough to undertake any of those actions (On stage? With witnesses? The horror!) but there is one thing about improv that I do understand and try to emulate.

The one rule when improvising is that you say ‘yes’. Yes to all possibilities. Yes to all avenues. It’s essentially acting out the words ‘why not?’ (It’s also related to perhaps the most basic building blocks of storytelling, the ‘what if?’)

It was ‘why not’ that led me to enter the very first Undiscovered Voices competition.

I said ‘yes’ even though I had no idea (and no confidence) that entering my three chapters would get me anywhere. Where it got me was the most important ‘yes’ of my writing career to date – an inclusion in the Undiscovered Voices anthology. That in turn led to other yes’s (along with many, many no’s). That one yes is the main reason I (eventually) became a published author and a full-time writer.

Where it got me was the most important ‘yes’ of my writing career to date – an inclusion in the Undiscovered Voices anthology.

Holding ‘yes’, or at least, ‘why not?’ in your mind is also helpful when it comes to the editorial process. It particularly comes into its own when someone makes a radical suggestion about changing your story.

Your first instinct might be to say something along the lines of ‘You think I should give my superhero protagonist a flying-dog sidekick with a flatulence problem? You great, galumphing fool!’

But if you give it time and an open mind sometimes you’ll discover that you agree with them – and that they’ve just helped you to make an enormous improvement to your work. (Note: sometimes the suggestion is just that of a great, galumphing fool though. Not everyone likes flatulence in stories, even coming from a flying-dog sidekick.)

You don’t have to writhe on the floor or stick chewing gum in your ear to become a good writer – but you do have to say ‘why not’.

You don’t have to writhe on the floor or stick chewing gum in your ear to become a good writer – but you do have to say ‘why not’. You do have to take a chance on yourself. So take your writing, believe in it, and enter the UV2018 competition. Say yes. Because you never know, they might say yes too.

Submissions for UV2018 will open on 1st July 2017 and will close 15th August 2017. Why not sign up here for a reminder when submissions open?


 

Kate Scott has written over 25 children’s books (trade fiction, educational fiction and non-fiction) and over forty children’s television scripts. She is also a script editor and consultant for children’s film and television; a published/broadcast poet; and a playwright. Spies in Disguise: Boy in Tights won a Lancashire Fantastic Book Award in 2015. Her latest children’s book, Giant, has been longlisted/nominated for two awards. Another standalone novel, Just Jack, comes out in 2018.

Agents: Eve White at Eve White Literary Agency (Books) and Jean Kitson at Kitson Press Associates (Scriptwriting)

Websites: www.evewhite.co.uk and www.kitsonpress.co.uk/

Twitter: @KateScottWriter

 

Getting Ready for UV2018 – Guest Blog with Jane Hardstaff

In the third of a series of guest blog by past finalists, Jane Hardstaff, talks about the twisty-turny route to becoming a published author, and almost not entering Undiscovered Voices 2012!

When I was sixteen years old, I had a weekend job as a waitress in a hotel in the small market town where we lived. The hotel restaurant was the place you ate if you were old-school posh. It had a veneer of class (avocado vinaigrette, Dover sole and grouse in season), but underneath it was kind-of seedy with many unpleasant tasks for a waitress. It was my job to pick the flies out of the vinaigrette with a teaspoon. To descend to the creepy cold store, always worried I’d lock myself in. To clean up after the very hairy hotel dog. Every Friday and Saturday night, I’d arrive home stinking of grease and cigar smoke and I guess you could say this was a pretty uninspiring job. I wasn’t being mentored on some amazing internship. I was hiding from the sleazeball barman and developing an addiction to prawn cocktail.

At sixteen years old I had no particular ambition to be a writer. All I knew was I didn’t want to be a waitress. Fast forward a couple of decades. I’d travelled a twisty-turny route through several jobs, discovering along the way that the one thing that made me happy (and also weirdly unhappy) was writing.

If you are wondering (as I did) whether to enter Undiscovered Voices, then you probably should.

What has any of this got to do with Undiscovered Voices? I guess what I want to say is, it can take a long time to find your voice. And it can take just as long to pluck up the courage to get it out there. If you are wondering (as I did) whether to enter Undiscovered Voices, then you probably should. You are probably your own worst critic. Enter, because you have nothing to lose. And if you’re not longlisted, keep going. Write a better book. Write the book only you can write.

It may take half a lifetime to get there, but it will be worth it.

 


The Executioner's Daughter
The Executioner’s Daughter by Jane Hardstaff

Jane Hardstaff (UV 2012) is the author of The Executioner’s Daughter and River Daughter (published by Egmont UK and Lerner Books USA). Longlisted for the Branford Boase, winner of the Salisbury Schools Book Award and selected for USBBY Outstanding International Books List 2017.

 

Submissions for UV2018 will open on 1st July 2017 and will close 15th August 2017. Why not sign up here for a reminder when submissions open?

UV2018 Buzz Round Up

A buzz is building about #UV2018 and we’ll be capturing blog posts and reports here.

Missed the Undiscovered Voices Masterclass about writing Young Fiction? Check out this report in Words & Pictures by Marianna Reed Barber who shares some of what she learnt from UV committee members Catherine Coe, Sara Grant and Benjamin Scott. This piece is packed with excellent advice on creating fiction for young readers with hook, heart and longevity: http://www.wordsandpics.org/2017/05/undiscovered-voices-masterclass.html

Want to catch what the judges said at the UV Kick Off event, then track down the livestream video on the SCBWI British Isles Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/122794234418913/videos/

Former UV finalists have been blogging about their writing journeys and how being featured in the anthology was an important step in their careers.

Em Lynas talks about her tenacity and enduring dream to be writer that lead to become both an honorary mention and a finalist in Undiscovered Voices. Her hard work and patience is finally paying off, find out more in her blog here: http://www.notesfromtheslushpile.com/2017/05/the-writers-journey-how-long.html

Finally, Katrina Charman talks about her career really took off when she became a UV finalist and has now become the author of eleven books (and rising!). You can read about her blog and encouragement to writers to enter UV here: https://katrinacharman.wordpress.com/2017/05/05/undiscovered-voices/

 

UV2018 submissions will open on 1st July 2017 and will close 15th August 2017. Why not sign up here for a reminder when submissions open?

UV2018 – Words & Pictures Special Feature

UV committee members Benjamin Scott and Catherine Coe talk to SCBWI BI Words & Picture Events Editor A. M. Dassu about the reason for setting up UV and the upcoming special writing younger fiction Masterclass.

Benjamin and Catherine offer tips and insights in the sixth Undiscovered Voices competition. Read more here.

 

 

2016 Success Story: Angels and an Agents for Sophie Cameron

Sophie CameronWith her gripping story about angels falling from sky, it wasn’t going to be long before someone snapped up finalist Sophie Cameron. We’re delight to share the news that she has been signed by Hellie Ogden at Janklow & Nesbit.

Sophie, who wrote Out of the Blue, says, “Undiscovered Voices has been an amazing boost, both to my writing career and to my confidence! I really didn’t expect to be selected, so to make the anthology and then to get such a great response from agents and publishers was hugely exciting.”

Out of the Blue follows the story of Jaya MacKenzie combining a personal tragedy against a global phenomenon of falling angels. With her dad determined to capture one of the angels alive, will Jaya and her family ever get a chance to come to terms with her mum’s death? As one of the judges said, “a very original premise pulled off skillfully.”

Meeting at the launch party, Hellie and Sophie hit it off straight away. “I felt sure she was the right agent for me,” Sophie says. “As well as being really lovely, she has such a fantastic vision for ‘Out of the Blue‘, and I know with her editorial help it’ll be a much stronger novel.”

And, agent Hellie Ogden couldn’t be happier. “I am a huge fan of Undiscovered Voices; the talent is always exceptional so it’s a really important resource for agents,” she says. “I was blown away by the quality this year and to find, and then get to represent, the incredibly talented Sophie Cameron is really exciting. Sophie is one to watch.”

We couldn’t put it better ourselves. But we’ll leave the last word to Sophie: “Getting to meet the other writers and illustrators was great, too – I’ve loved hearing their success stories and am excited to see their work in print! It’s been a brilliant experience and I’m so grateful to the organisers and to SCBWI British Isles for the opportunity. Thank you!”

Undiscovered Voices 2014: The Finalists!

SCBWI British Isles is proud to announce the promising, unpublished writers and illustrators who have been selected from hundreds of submissions to be included in Undiscovered Voices 2014.

SCBWI congratulates the following twelve authors whose novel extracts will be featured in the anthology:

  • Phoenix by Katrina Charman, Wokingham, Berkshire
  • This Grimm Life by Christian Colussi, London
  • Vickery Barnet Recurring by Sarah Dalkin, London
  • The Voyage of the Onion by Claire Fayers, Cardiff
  • The Wing Giver by Emma Higham, London
  • A Good Hiding by Shirley-Anne McMillan, Maghera Village, Castlewellan
  • Fire Girl by Matt Ralphs, Old Wives Lees, Kent
  • Traitor Girl by Rachel Rivett, Basingstoke, Hampshire
  • Atticus Trump and the Astro Fart by Bronwen Roscoe, Effingham, Surrey
  • Southend Loaded by Susan Sandercock, Canvey Island, Essex
  • The Stone Cutter by Tioka Tokedira, Paris, France
  • Shadow Inclusions by Imogen White, Hove, East Sussex

 The following five illustrators will have an illustration featured in the 2014 anthology. These artists created black and white drawings in response to a series of original scenes created by past Undiscovered Voices writers.

  • James Brown, Nottingham
  • Dave Gray, Coventry
  • Olivia Palmer, London
  • Sarah Palmer, Coventry
  • Julia Walther, Germany

For the first time the Undiscovered Voices anthology will be available to download for free from http://www.undiscoveredvoices.com/. A printed copy of the anthology also will be available to purchase from Lulu. The anthology will be available from the website by the end of next week.

The submissions were anonymously selected by the following panel of editors, agents and art directors:

  • Gemma Cooper, Literary Agent, The Bent Agency
  • Helen Graham-Cameron, Graham-Cameron Illustration Agency
  • Ben Horslen, Editorial Director, Puffin
  • Sarah Lambert, Editorial Director, Quercus Children’s Books
  • Francis McKay, Francis McKay Illustration Agency
  • Polly Nolan, Literary Agent, The Greenhouse Literary Agency
  • Sara O’Connor, Editorial Director for Print & Digital, Hot Key Books
  • Martin Salisbury, Professor of Illustration; Course Leader, MA Children’s Book Illustration, and Director of The Centre for Children’s Book Studies
  • Samantha Smith, Fiction Publisher, Scholastic
  • Sallyanne Sweeney, Literary Agent, Mulcahy Associates
  • Ngheim Ta, Senior Designer/Digital Content Coordinator, Templar Books

Because the anthology is also designed to be a learning tool for up-and-coming children’s writers and artists, quotes from the judges – discussing the merits of each piece – are included at the end of each illustration and extract.

Working Partners Ltd, a London-based company that creates series fiction for children and teens, provided the financial support that made this anthology possible.

Congratulations to this year’s Undiscovered Voices writers and illustrators!

Keep coming back to see how they get on!

SCBWI British Isles is proud to announce the promising, unpublished writers and illustrators who have been selected from hundreds of submissions to be included in